For the Infinite Collector of Books

Somewhere on my resume, I should have the title: Infinite Collector of Books.

I really also should be in some 12 step program for this literary addiction. 

If you were to visit my home, you couldn’t help notice just how many books I have stacked and double-stacked on sagging bookshelves. I prefer the term collector rather than hoarder, but really there isn’t too much difference. IMG_1009

I set up alerts in my iPhone for the Dollar Days sale at the used book store.

I know what time the nearby Barnes and Noble closes, the aisles and genres in Ed McKay’s, and the fastest way/cheapest way to get the most out of my Amazon Prime membership.

Lest I should forget, the library located down the street from my house and the wonderous thing that is InterLibrary Loan. As if the title of poet/writer didn’t clue you on my love of the written word, let me just spell it out for you:

I’m a bibliophile, and I love books.

But even good things, like books, can turn into a wretched white elephant if we’re not careful. Because I could/always will be able to justify used books or the occasional new book, I accumlated more books faster than I could read the ones that I had already bought. See the problem? Lots of books+ More books= a reader with shelves of lovely short stories, poems, memoirs, novels–ALL UNREAD.If you follow me on GoodReads, I even created a whole shelf for books that I own, and most of them fall under the category of “to read.”

As cliche as it sounds, part of the solution is admitting that I have a problem.

But the other part of the solution is doing something about it! While it will break my heart and help my wallet, I’m giving up buying books for awhile or even checking books for myself at the library.  I need to read what I own before I parade any more writers, novelists, poets into my house to sit upon those tired shelves.

Beginning today, I’m giving myself a bit of a summer reading challenge.

I’ve selected 11 books from my own library that I will read. In order to bring any more books to my loving home, I have to finish all 11 books. Now, I’m not setting a timeline or some due date because I already have a long wish list/library list of books waiting for me. Throughout the summer, I will blog about my progress through these books. How much I love/hate/apathetic toward these books…there could also be some wailing and gnashing of teeth…

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The Read Your Shelves Challenge:

  1. The Farthest Shore by Ursula K. Le Guin
  2. Tehanu by Ursula K. Le Guin
  3. Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain
  4. Sinners Welcome: Poems by Mary Karr
  5. The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
  6. Ariel by Sylvia Plath
  7. The Writing Life by Annie Dilliard
  8. Delta Wedding by Eudora Welty
  9. A Year in the Life of Shakespeare by James Shapiro
  10. East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  11. Dear Life: Stories by Alice Munro

What books on your shelves need to be read before you get new ones? How many do you have unread?(I can neither confirm or deny that I have A LOT)

10 Books a Week: Poetry

Yesterday, I gave y’all my 10 Books a Week that influenced my faith. Today, I’m deviating from Sarah Bessey’s Parenting books(sorry, most books written specifically about step-parenting should be ignored–the most wretched parenting advice ever) or her lovely Canadian books to read(I suppose I could do a series on books by Virginians or North Carolinians, but not today).

Today is for poetry that has influenced me–the poet writer, the beauty seeker, the truth teller.

 Ten Poets who Influence my Poetry:

  1. Geoffry Chaucer: Perhaps, this poet/writer is a bit of a shock. What NO Shakespeare? As a poet, I find Chaucer’s banter funnier and more engaging than The Bard…but what do you expect from a Medievalist?
  2. Irish Ballads and Folk Songs: In high school, my closest friends and I were in a huge Irish phase. Now, my family did come from Ireland before the Civil War which somehow cemented my need to connect to my Irish heritage. The myths are bare and lovely. The songs sad, a bit tongue in cheek at times. But then again, so am I.
  3. William Butler Yeats: Oh look, another Irish poet. I adore Yeats’ complexity, his cyclic poetic nature, his Crazy Jane poems(somewhere, I have a lovely 20 something page grad seminar paper on these poems…never to see the light of day again). I see his quirky way of seeing nature, characters, and god, and this is poetry that I want to write.
  4. Sylvia Plath: Her poetry isn’t full of fancy words, but neither is mine. I love her choice of simple, plain words to convey the image, the feeling, the moment. Her poem Mirror still haunts me.
  5. English Romantic Poets: William Blake and Samuel Taylor Coleridge: In order to understand Yeat, I needed to read Blake. His Innocence and Experience poems probe many of the questions about faith and God that I find in myself. And in my poetry. Coleridge is merely sentimental albatross. I love his poetry, but he doesn’t play a large part in what I write.
  6. English Victorian Poets: Gerard Manly Hopkins and Christina Rossetti: Despite the overly flowery nature of Hopkins poetry(try reading The Windhover without getting your tongue tangled), I love his representations of God, God’s nature in nature…Pied Beauty represents some of the most lovely of Hopkins’s works. Then, Christina Rossetti, her poetry has some of the best representations of faith. Of course, who doesn’t adore Goblin Market?
  7. Emily Dickinson: She was the first American poet that I read and adored. Her abstractness appealed to me in way that other Americans from the 19th century just didn’t.
  8. William Carlos Williams: Simple images, plain language, image is the key. Like many, I got hung up one red wagons, ice box plums, but then I looked and read closer. The image pulses with life that Williams didn’t need so many words…just the image.
  9. T.S. Eliot: Oh look, Eliot returns again to my lists. I’m drawn to his poetry during the latter part of this life. His Ariel poems, his Four Quartets, his Hollow Men. I don’t see him so much in my poetry, but I feel his influence every time I read him. Odd as it may seem, his poetry is my go to for solace and comfort.
  10. H.D.: Another Imagist, her poetry moves and breathes and makes my head swim with its loveliest. She is the most influential when it comes to my poetry. I adore her.

Honorable mentions: William Shakespeare, Elizabeth Bishop, Dante, Ted Hughes, e.e. cummings, John Donne, Basho

 

What poets do you enjoy reading? Share in the comments.

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