10 Books-a-Week: Faith

This week, my blogging friend Sarah Bessey will be sharing her bookshelves with us. And I love the idea of lists, of books, of books and lists together.

 

Yesterday, she gave her books of faith books that have moved her forward in her spiritual journey. Today, I shall share mine.

  1.  The Bible: I suppose it should be a given since it is MY primary faith text, but for years, I satisfied myself with what others said about this book. I no longer let scholars or those who can give me lengthy dissertations in Greek origins form my entire opinion. I read and search for myself, and this has changed my thinking.
  2. C.S. Lewis Til We Have Faces: The myth of Psyche and the strangling love of her sister Orual. I adore Lewis’s retelling, his emphasis on the growth of love from selfish love to a purer love.
  3. L.E. Maxwell Embraced by the CrossThe entire book focuses on the cross and its relationship to Christ, to us, to others.  Written by a Canadian(extra points from Sarah Bessery who is Canadian herself), he delves with grace into Scripture. Beautiful writing, enough said.
  4. Christine de Pizan The Treasure of the City of Ladies: I first read this book in a graduate seminar Feminist Rhetoric and Pedagogy(no, not all feminist courses deviate from faith or even the Christian faith. In fact, feminism brought me back to Jesus). Pizan wrote several conduct manuals for women, men, knights. And served on the king of France’s court. And supported her family without a husband. And did ALL of this in Medieval France. She is considered to be the world’s first professional woman writer. In this book, she guides women in how to behave. She emphasizes that women should love their husbands, their maid servants and the poor. This is the treasure of ladies. Of course, her instructions for harlots should not be missed either.
  5. C.S. Lewis The Great Divorce: After reading Love Wins, I read this book. Lewis discusses the idea of hell and purgatory that challenges how I perceive what these two places could be. I’m not sure that I would fully embrace this whole construction, but it made me think more closely about my faith in the afterlife.
  6. Rachel Held Evans Evolving in Monkey Town: When I read this book, I felt like she had written about my life except I grew up in Lynchburg, VA not Dayton, TN (another center for the religious right). She expresses beautifully the struggles of growing up fully engulfed in faith and asking questions about our faith. I can’t wait for her next book coming out in October.
  7. Anne Jackson Permission to Speak Freely: I love the whole premise of this book…what would you say in church if you could speak freely? I haven’t figured what I would say out yet, but the book is beautifully written and worth reading.
  8. Lauren Winner Girl Meets God: The first spiritual memoir that I ever read. I love Winner’s writing style, her faith. It felt like a breath of fresh air for one choking on the bitter tonic of conservative evangelicalism.
  9. T.S. Eliot Complete Poems and Plays: Of course, a poet must have a book of poetry. I love reading Eliot because I can see how his faith strengthens throughout his poetry. I adore Ash Wednesday.
  10. Anne Lamott Traveling Mercies (not pictured because I don’t own a copy. If anyone is feeling generous, I would love one): After reading Bird by Bird, I picked up Traveling Mercies. She approaches faith and Jesus from a completely opposite point of view and writes about her journey so candidly. I also have several more of her books on faith too…just waiting for the time to read them.

What books have changed your faith? Share in the comments!

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5 thoughts on “10 Books-a-Week: Faith

  1. Till We Have Faces is a book I bought a couple of months ago because a few people were going on and on about how great it was….and now it sits on my shelf because I can read it whenever I want…which means I never do, LOL, because I have library books to finish!   This is motivating me to read it, since I bought it for a reason!

  2. These are all so good. I still remember how badly I wanted a friend to talk about “Til We Have Faces” with! At the time, no one in my real life read books like that and the Internet hadn’t been invented. Man, I was desperate to talk about that one. Now I want to re-read it…

    1. When I read it (there was internet but just AOL), I longed for someone else to discuss said book with…maybe, we need to reread it as a blog series. I would love that!

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